SCHS SPANISH - Preterite vs Imperfect Intro (2023)

Table of Contents
When you finish this page, you should be able to say: General Info Words that usually indicate the preterite is needed (specific times) Words that usually indicate the imperfect is needed (vague times) Hablar: Preterite Hablar: Imperfect Sometimes, even though the translation of the verb is the same in English for both Spanish past tenses, the context of the sentence drives whether to use the preterite or imperfect. If it is stated or implied that the action occured a countable number of times (once, twice, etc), use the preterite. If it is implied that the action occurred over and over again, but no one's counting, then use the imperfect. ACRONYMS to Help Choose between them Concerning preterite action verbs: Concerning "was/were": Concerning "had": Concerning Health: Concerning imperfect action verbs: Concerning "was/were": Concerning "had": THE LETTER H also stands for HEALTH Activity: Preterite or Imperfect weather? Self-check If you already can recognize preterite and/or imperfect forms, see if you can tell which verb to use yet. If not, do this in class with the teacher. Activity B: Preterite or Imperfect? Why? Imperfect: Preterite: Activity C: Choose between the preterite and imperfect Graded Activity: Make your own imperfect vs preterite poster. Include the infinitives, an imperfect/preterite section, what the verbs mean in each past tense, a clearly expressed example sentence showing the difference in meaning and an illustration to support the verb meaning for each. FAQs Videos

Speaking in the past with the preterite and imperfect

When you finish this page, you should be able to say:

  • I can name the two simple past tenses in Spanish.

  • I can give a general overview of how each is used.

  • I can choose between the preterite and imperfect in simple examples that match the acronyms.

Click here to go to the Conjugations Lesson

General Info

  1. Spanish has 2 simple past tenses. "Simple" here means that you use 1 verb, not a compound verb (like had eaten or was eating).

  2. One is called the preterite (el pretérito) and the other is called the imperfect (el imperfecto).

  3. They have distinct uses and are sometimes translated differently in the past.

  4. The rule of thumb to fall back on if you forget all the details of this lesson is

If the action happened a countable number of times, use the preterite. Otherwise, default imperfect.

Words that usually indicate the preterite is needed (specific times)

  • Ayer: Yesterday

  • De repente: Suddenly

  • Un día: One day

  • Una vez, dos veces, etc. : One time, two times, etc

  • Otra vez: Again

  • Anoche: Last night

  • La semana pasada; el verano pasado: Last week, Last summer

  • Por <tiempo>: For an amount of time

  • Esta mañana: This morning

  • A la una; A las dos: At a specific time

Words that usually indicate the imperfect is needed (vague times)

  • Siempre: Always

  • Used to and Would (implied by imperfect ending)

  • Generalmente, Típicamente, Normalmente, Frecuentemente: Generally, Typically, Normally, Frequently

  • Muchas veces, A menundo: Often

  • De vez en cuando: Once in a while

  • Mientras: While

  • Todos los días, Cada día: Every day, Each day

  • On (Mondays, Tuesdays, etc): Los (lunes, martes, etc)

Hablar: Preterite

  • Yo hablé : I spoke (at a specific moment), I did speak

  • Tú hablaste: You spoke, you did speak

  • Ella, él, usted habló: She, he, you (formal) spoke, did speak

  • Nosotros hablamos: We spoke, we did speak

  • Ellos, ustedes hablaron: They spoke, they did speak

Hablar: Imperfect

(Video) Teaching Preterite vs. Imperfect Games : Lifelong Learning

Sometimes, even though the translation of the verb is the same in English for both Spanish past tenses, the context of the sentence drives whether to use the preterite or imperfect. If it is stated or implied that the action occured a countable number of times (once, twice, etc), use the preterite. If it is implied that the action occurred over and over again, but no one's counting, then use the imperfect.

  • I went camping last Sunday. Yo acampé el domingo pasado.

  • I ate breakfast today. Hoy, desayuné.

  • We visited Mexico 3 times. Visitamos México 3 veces.

  • All of a sudden, it started raining. De repente, empezó a llover.

  • She got mad. Ella se enojó. / Ella se puso enojada.

  • They didn't arrive on time. Ellos no llegaron a tiempo.

  • They were there for 5 minutes. Estuvieron allí por 5 minutos.

  • I used to go camping on Sundays. Yo acampaba los domingos.

  • I normally ate breakfast. Normalmente desayunaba.

  • We visited Mexico every Christmas. Visitábamos México cada Navidad.

  • It rained often. Llovía mucho.

  • She was angry with him. Ella estaba enojada con él.

  • They were there... Estaban allí.

ACRONYMS to Help Choose between them

SCHS SPANISH - Preterite vs Imperfect Intro (1)Scanned_20180320-0802.pdf

Concerning preterite action verbs:

Used for specific, countable actions with clear beginnings and endings.

On a time line of your life, these are the DOTS that show what happened at a specific point.

Concerning "was/were":

Only put "was" into the preterite if you are referring to how an event went (It was great! It was boring...) or how someone REACTED emotionally to something else that just happened. (He ripped her paper and she was furious.)

Concerning "had":

"Had" will only be in the preterite if 1) you are referring to a moment that someone had to do something (Where did Diego go? I don't know... He had to leave. ¿Dónde está Diego? Yo no sé... Se tuvo que ir.) or 2) You are referring to the moment that someone obtained something.

(Video) Preterite Tense Intro & Regular Verbs

Concerning Health:

Health is usually imperfect, unless you are referring to the beginning of the situation: (He got sick... He recovered...He improved...)

SCHS SPANISH - Preterite vs Imperfect Intro (2)Scanned_20180320-0802.pdf

Concerning imperfect action verbs:

Used for repetitive, habitual, ongoing, endless past actions with no clear beginning or end. They happened multiple times, but no one knows or is saying how many times or for how long.

On a time line of your life, these would be hard to figure out how to illustrate since no one knows exactly when the actions happened.

Concerning "was/were":

Was/Were will almost always be imperfect. Unless you are doing what is stated to the left, you will use the imperfect.

Concerning "had":

"Had" will almost always be in the imperfect. Tener expressions (like tener hambre, tener años, tener frío) will also almost always be in the imperfect.

THE LETTER H also stands for HEALTH

The same rules apply for Emotions: Use the imperfect unless you are referring to the beginning of the emotion/health status.

Weather is often said to be an imperfect idea, but there are many times when weather events should be preterite.

It's imperfect when it's background information or a description.

      • It was snowing when we woke up. It was raining hard.

It's preterite when it's an event.

      • It snowed last night. It rained during the parade.

SCHS SPANISH - Preterite vs Imperfect Intro (3)

Activity: Preterite or Imperfect weather?

  1. Yesterday, it snowed.

  2. Yesterday, it was snowing.

  3. It was raining, so we decided to watch a movie.

  4. While we were watching fireworks, it rained.

  5. Last night, it hailed.

  6. It was sunny and hot.

  7. It was windy and chilly.

  8. The wind howled during the storm.

  9. The weather was nice.

Self-check

If you already can recognize preterite and/or imperfect forms, see if you can tell which verb to use yet. If not, do this in class with the teacher.

https://www.spanishdict.com/quizzes/64/preterite-vs-imperfect-in-spanish

When something was in progress, or happening (often an -ing idea in English), and something else happened in the midst of that progress (interrupting it), then we will have both imperfect and preterite verbs.

  • Note that these sentences will have 2 complete ideas in the past tense and they will be joined with a conjunction like "when" or "so." (We were sleeping when the tornado came. I was running late, so I didn't get a shower. Everyone was screaming; therefore, the teacher gave us detention.)

  • The imperfect part will be that ongoing action (I was running, We were eating, They were taking a test, It was snowing)

  • The preterite will be the action that happened (interrupted) at one point during the ongoing action.

  • The preterite action MIGHT STOP the imperfect action from continuing (I was typing the last sentence of my essay when my battery died.) But, it might not affect the ongoing action at all (The pizza was hot when I took a bite. ---The pizza didn't stop being hot just because I took I bite. / It was raining, so I decided to stay inside. --My decision to stay inside did not literally interrupt the rain.)

  • We can use a visual tool to represent these sentences: a double sided arrow shows that the action was happening before and after the preterite event took place. We write the imperfect sentence on the arrow. The DOT represents the 1 time action that happened at some point . We draw a dot and a line segment leading away from the dot. We write the preterite sentence on that line segment. See below.

(Video) Learn Spanish Tenses: Use IMPERFECTO to talk about your past

SCHS SPANISH - Preterite vs Imperfect Intro (4)Scanned_20180320-0843.pdf

SCHS SPANISH - Preterite vs Imperfect Intro (5)Scanned_20180320-0846.pdf

SCHS SPANISH - Preterite vs Imperfect Intro (6)Scanned_20180320-0904.pdf

Warning

Just because you have 2 complete ideas in a sentence does not automatically mean you'll have 1 imperfect and 1 preterite idea.

If both ideas are ongoing, endless, or with no clear beginning or end, both ideas will be imperfect. See the illustration to the left.

On the other hand, if both ideas are clearly specific moments in the past, then both will be preterite.

Activity B: Preterite or Imperfect? Why?

  1. It was winter.

  2. He got frustrated.

  3. He was frustrated.

  4. She left.

  5. Everyone used to swim here.

  6. It was midnight.

  7. When I was 10 years old...

  8. She fell ill last year.

  9. She was sick for a long time.

  10. She was sick for 10 days.

  11. It was a cloudy and cold day.

  12. It rained yesterday.

  13. It was raining, so we didn't go.

  14. We were walking when the dog broke his leash.

  15. Suddenly, she realized that...

  16. You always used to sleep with that bear.

  17. You fell asleep while you watched TV again.

  18. We typically cooked our own meals.

  19. They would drive by every night, shouting.

  20. They drove down my driveway one night.

This isn't random. It goes back to the idea that the preterite is for a specific moment in the past. If you put these particular verbs in the preterite, it must be referring to the BEGINNING of that action, which in most cases changes the English translation.

(Video) Learning Spanish: Preterite Tense Regular Verbs - Common Ground International

Imperfect:

  • Querer: Wanted/Loved

  • Saber: Knew (info)

  • Conocer: Knew (a person)

  • Tener: Had

  • Poder: Could

  • No querer: Didn't want/love

  • No poder: Couldn't

Preterite:

  • Querer: Tried (to)

  • Saber: Found out (info)

  • Conocer: Met (a person)

  • Tener: Received/Got

  • Poder: Tried and succeeded

  • No querer: Refused

  • No poder: to fail (after attempting)

  1. Marcos always wanted a motorcycle. One day, he tried to ride his friend's. Marcos siempre quería una motocicleta. Un día, quiso montar la de su amigo.

  2. Marcos knew that a helmet was required. After his accident, he found out why. Marcos sabía que se requería un casco. Después de su accidente, supo por qué.

  3. Marcos knew many people who had motorcyles. One day, he met his idol. Marcos conocía a muchas personas con motocicletas. Un día, conoció a su ídolo.

  4. Marcos wasn't afraid of anything. One day, he had to prove it. Marcos no tenía miedo a nada. Un día, él tuvo que probarlo.

  5. Marcos used to have a skateboard. He got it for Christmas when he was 10. Marcos tenía una patineta. La tuvo (obtuvo) en la Navidad cuando tenía 10 años.

  6. Marcos could skateboard very well. He tried to backflip and succeeded! Marcos podía andar en patineta muy bien. ¡Pudo voltearse al revés!

  7. Marcos didn't want to injure himself. When a friend dared him to (idk what), he refused. Marcos no quería lastimarse. Cuando un amigo le retó (no sé qué), él no quiso.

  8. Marcos couldn't do a varial flip. He tried 4 times and failed. Marcos no podía hacer un varial flip. Trató 4 veces pero no pudo.

Activity C: Choose between the preterite and imperfect

1. Yo (conocí/conocía) a Harry Styles en el concierto.

2. (Conocía/Conocí) a su hermano por varios años antes de que se fue.

SCHS SPANISH - Preterite vs Imperfect Intro (7)5 verbs that change meaning in preterite

Graded Activity:

Make your own imperfect vs preterite poster. Include the infinitives, an imperfect/preterite section, what the verbs mean in each past tense, a clearly expressed example sentence showing the difference in meaning and an illustration to support the verb meaning for each.

Grade: 100 Silver Points

Content: Is the project complete and does it follow directions, including all required components? 30

Communication: Are the sentences easy to understand? Do the pictures reflect what the sentences are saying? Is the student using the preterite and imperfect verbs the way they are meant to be used to get the meaning across? 40

Accuracy: Are conjugations correct? Is there subject/verb agreement? Are spelling errors and punctuation errors very minimal? Are other grammatical rules followed that we´ve learned so far? 20

Neatness: Is the paper free of wrinkles, smears, and tears? Is the space used well? Is the handwriting legible? Are the drawings neat? 10

FAQs

How do you tell the difference between preterite and imperfect in Spanish? ›

The rule of thumb for determining which tense to use is that the preterite talks about what you did, and the imperfect talks about what you were doing or what you used to do.

How do you remember preterite or imperfect? ›

Distinguishing Between Preterite and Imperfect

The basic rule of thumb when it comes to figuring out which tense to use is that the preterite talks about things you did, and the imperfect talks about things you were doing at some point in time, or that you used to do.

What is the main difference between the uses of the preterite and the imperfect? ›

Two Different Past Tenses

The essential difference is that the preterite tense is about actions that are fully completed and were done once at a specific time. Conversely, the imperfect tense is about actions that were repeatedly performed during a past period of time.

How do you know if its passe compose or Imparfait? ›

When used in the same sentence, Imparfait will be used for the background action, the longer action that's going on, and Passé-composé for the specific shorter action.

How do you know if a sentence is preterite? ›

Use the preterite when a completed action is repeated a specific number of times. For example: Fui al aeropuerto tres veces ayer. I went to the airport three times yesterday.

What are 5 words commonly used with the preterite? ›

Check out these examples of temporal phrases that can trigger the preterite:
  • una vez (one time)
  • ayer (yesterday)
  • anteayer (the day before yesterday)
  • anoche (last night)
  • la semana pasada (last week)
  • el año pasado (last year)
  • el otro día (the other day)
  • entonces (then)

How do you memorize the imperfect tense in Spanish? ›

To form the imperfect of any regular -ar verb, you take off the -ar ending of the infinitive to form the stem and add the endings: -aba, -abas, -aba, -ábamos, -abais, -aban. The following table shows the imperfect tense of one regular -ar verb: hablar (meaning to speak).

What are the 5 uses of the imperfect tense? ›

When to use the imperfect tense
  • Actions that were habitual or happened frequently in the past. “I used to…” ...
  • Feelings, emotions, mental actions, or physical sensations. “I was…” ...
  • Time and age. “It was…” ...
  • Two simultaneous events taking place at a non-specific point in the past. ...
  • Attributes or general descriptions of the past.

What are the 3 imperfect verbs? ›

The verbs ser (to be), ir (to go), and ver (to see) are completely irregular in the imperfect tense.

What are 3 uses of the imperfect? ›

The imperfect is used to:
  • describe repeated, habitual, or usual actions in the past.
  • describe actions that were ongoing in the past.
  • describe what things were like in the past.
  • describe time and people's ages in the past.

What does the preterite and imperfect have in common? ›

Preterite and Imperfect do share one thing, however. One feature that they have in common is that both tenses are simple, meaning that they do not use auxiliary verbs such as 'to be' (estar) and 'to have' (haber).

Is yesterday imperfect or preterite? ›

The imperfect is used to express an action that was not completed once, but several times in the past. There exist some words that will trigger the use of the Preterite. These are words that indicate very concrete times in the past, like: Ayer (yesterday)

Is age in the past preterite or imperfect? ›

Whenever you want to refer to someone's age in the past or tell what was the time when something happened, also use the imperfect tense.

When should imparfait be used? ›

The imperfect tense (l'imparfait) has two primary uses: to describe on-going actions and states of being in the past, and to state habitual actions in the past.

What is the rule of imparfait? ›

How to Conjugate Verbs in the Imparfait: The stem consists of the first-person plural (nous) form of the present tense without the o n s ending. Add the following endings to the stem: a i s, a i s, a i t, i o n s, i e z, a i e n t. All of the singular and the third-person plural endings are pronounced the same way.

How do you identify passé composé? ›

The passé composé, a compound past tense, is formed by combining two elements: when (the action has taken place and, therefore, requires the helping verb avoir) and what (the action that has happened and, therefore, requires the past participle of the regular or irregular verb showing the particular action).

What are the 16 preterite irregular verbs? ›

Terms in this set (16)
  • Ser. To be.
  • Ir. To go.
  • Dar. To give.
  • Ver. To see.
  • Poder. To be able to.
  • Poner. To put/place.
  • Saber. To know.
  • Hacer. To do.

How many endings do preterite have? ›

How many sets of regular preterite endings are there? The good news is there are only two sets of endings for regular preterite verbs: one for –ar verbs and another one for –er and –ir verbs. Less conjugations to memorise – that's a win!

What triggers the preterite? ›

You'll use the Spanish preterite tense while talking about actions that happened in the past. They started, ended, and are now considered completed. Ayer, tomé una siesta de dos horas. Yesterday, I had a two-hour nap. You see, it's a completed action.

Which two words help connect the imperfect and Preterit? ›

The conjunction mientras can be used to join two verbs in the imperfect, or it can be used in sentences where one verb is in the preterite and the other is in the imperfect.

What are three irregular verbs in preterite? ›

Regular verbs have three different endings in the infinitive form, so by applying this rule you can conjugate them all. Then we have the preterite irregular verbs.
...
Here you have a list of irregular verbs and their stems in the preterite.
Irregular VerbPreterite Stem
poderpud
ponerpus
sabersup
tenertuv
24 more rows

What is the hardest Spanish tense? ›

The Subjunctive Tense in Spanish

This is one of the most confusing verb tenses for English speakers to understand. The reason? There really is no such tense used in English language, hence all the mind-boggling confusion.

What is the fastest way to memorize Spanish lines? ›

Here are 7 tips to help you memorize a Spanish paragraph quickly.
  1. Translate the paragraph into English. Translate the paragraph you want to memorize into English. ...
  2. Check the pronunciation. ...
  3. Record yourself speaking. ...
  4. Listen to the recording. ...
  5. Read it out loud. ...
  6. Write it out. ...
  7. Test your memory.
23 Oct 2022

What are the 16 Spanish tenses? ›

In total, there are 14 (7 simple and 7 compound): Present, Imperfect, Preterite, Future, Conditional, Present Perfect, Pluperfect, Preterit Perfect, Future Perfect, Conditional Perfect, Present Subjunctive, Imperfect Subjunctive, Present Perfect Subjunctive, and Pluperfect Subjunctive.

What is the car gar ZAR rule? ›

Regular verbs that end in –car, -gar, -zar have a spelling change in the YO form of the preterite so that the sound of the verb stem remains the same. Think about it: Try taking the verb “sacar” and adding just an é to the root: You get “sacé” which in Spanish would be pronounced “sah-say.”

Is weather preterite or imperfect? ›

The imperfect tense is also used to describe weather in the past. For example: Hacía sol/calor (It was sunny/hot) Estaba frío/nublado, etc (It was cold/cloudy, etc)

What are the 2 main endings the imperfect tense uses in Spanish? ›

Imperfect Verb Endings in Spanish

There are two sets of rules for the endings of regular imperfect verbs in Spanish, one set is for '-ar' ending verbs and the other set is for the '-er' and '-ir ' ending verbs.

What are the only 3 irregular verbs in the imperfect tense? ›

The verbs ir (to go), ver (to see), and ser (to be) are completely irregular in the imperfect tense.

What are the 6 uses of the imperfect tense? ›

Terms in this set (6)
  • Habitual or repeated actions. Ibamos.
  • Events or actions that were in progress. Leía.
  • Telling time. Eran.
  • Age. Tenian.
  • Physical characteristics. Era.
  • Mental or emotional states. Quería.

What is imperfect example? ›

The imperfect tense is used to refer to actions in the past that occurred repeatedly. I used to walk every day. Yo caminaba cada día. The imperfect tense is also used to refer to actions in the past that occurred over an extended period of time.

Is emotion preterite or imperfect? ›

The imperfect is used to describe past actions that have no clear beginning and end. This includes descriptions, age, weather, time, and emotions.

How do you explain the imperfect tense in Spanish? ›

The imperfect (imperfecto) is one of the two simple past tenses in Spanish. It is used for ongoing or recurrent actions in the past. It is also used for descriptions, states of being, and for providing background information about the past.

What are three differences between the imperfect and the preterite? ›

The preterite shows the specific time when some event took place; the imperfect shows the general time when some event took place in the past. 3. The preterite tense is used to denote an action which is typically done once; the imperfect is used to denote an action which has been done frequently in the past.

How do preterite and imperfect work together? ›

We can use the preterite and imperfect together to talk about the past. Use the imperfect to say what was going on or what was happening in the background. Use the preterite when what was happening in the background was interrupted by another action.

What are the two uses of the preterite? ›

The preterite is most often used to talk about actions and events in the past. These include: 1) A completed action or event. 2) A series of completed actions or events.

Do you use imperfect when talking about childhood? ›

Time and age. Whenever you talk about a specific time in the past in which your narrative takes place, or describe how old you were when something happened, use the imparfait. C'était le 1er janvier et je prenais mes résolutions du nouvel an.

What is the difference between the imperfect and the preterite in Spanish? ›

The imperfect is used to describe something that was happening at the time (veía la tele) and the preterite is used to talk about a single completed event (llegó mi amigo) that happened during the longer action.

Is suddenly preterite or imperfect? ›

Preterite vs. Imperfect - Uses
AB
When something happens suddenly or immediatelyPreterite
An ongoing action in the past (I was listening to the radio)Imperfect
A list of completed actionsPreterite
When something happened for the first time(It began to rain)Preterite
15 more rows

Is being sick preterite or imperfect? ›

If you wanted to indicate that she was sick during the particular period of time mentioned (yesterday), you would use the preterite. However, if you were simply describing how Anna's health had been lately, without reference to any particular time frame, you would use the imperfect.

What is the difference between preterite and imperfect examples? ›

The girls used to speak in English. You have now learned the basic difference between the preterite and the imperfect: The preterite tells us specifically when an action took place.
...
aba. abas. aba. ábamos. abais. aban.
PreteriteImperfect
hablóhablaba
hablamoshablábamos
hablasteishablabais
hablaronhablaban
2 more rows

How do you know if a Spanish word is imperfect? ›

To form the imperfect of any regular -er or -ir verb, you take off the -er or -ir ending of the infinitive to form the stem and add the endings: -ía, -ías, -ía, -íamos, -íais, -ían. The following table shows the imperfect of two regular verbs: comer (meaning to eat) and vivir (meaning to live).

What are examples of imperfect in Spanish? ›

The Imperfect
  • I used to walk every day. Yo caminaba cada día. ...
  • I used to eat paella frequently. Yo comía frecuentemente paella. ...
  • We were coming home when we saw Juan. Veníamos para casa cuando vimos a Juan. ...
  • Juan was feeling sick. Juan estaba enfermo.

What is the difference between preterite and past perfect Spanish? ›

The preterite is the basic past tense; we use this to express things in a sequential order. The past perfect expresses an action that happened before another past action. In a nutshell: the past perfect is 'the past of the past'.

What are the 3 imperfect verbs in Spanish? ›

The main 3 irregular verbs in the Spanish past imperfect tense are ser (to be), ir (to go) and ver (to see).

What are the 3 irregular verbs in the imperfect? ›

The verbs ser (to be), ir (to go), and ver (to see) are completely irregular in the imperfect tense.

How do you translate the imperfect tense? ›

To describe a past action or state which is incomplete, we use an imperfect tense. This tense indicates an action which has gone on over a period time or has happened frequently. It is translated into English by 'was/were' + '-ing' or 'used to'.

What are the 6 main uses of the imperfect tense? ›

Terms in this set (6)
  • Habitual or repeated actions. Ibamos.
  • Events or actions that were in progress. Leía.
  • Telling time. Eran.
  • Age. Tenian.
  • Physical characteristics. Era.
  • Mental or emotional states. Quería.

What are the 4 perfect tenses in Spanish? ›

Perfect Tenses in Spanish
  • The Present Perfect Tense.
  • The Pluperfect Tense.
  • The Future Perfect Tense.
  • The Conditional Perfect.
  • The Present Perfect Subjunctive.
  • The Pluperfect Subjunctive.
  • The Perfect Infinitive.

What is the difference between the preterite and the perfect tense? ›

However, they are used in different situations: The preterite tense is used for completed past actions, while the perfect tense is used for actions that take place in a time frame that has not yet ended, or for past actions that continue to influence the present.

Is pretérito indefinido the same as imperfect? ›

the simple past tense. Reminder: the pretérito imperfecto (imperfect tense) and the pretérito indefinido (simple past tense) are both used to talk about actions that took place in the past. These are often translated in the same way in English.

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